Youth Mental Wellness Film Fest

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May 26, 2022
4:00pm Hawaiian Time
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Welcome

The Youth Mental Wellness Film Fest showcases films on youth mental wellness produced during the youth filmmaking programs organized by Hawaiʻi Women in Filmmaking.

Video Descriptions

The Artist's Subject.mov

An artist attempts to paint a natural landscape when the view suddenly gets interrupted. The artist encounters a perspective through this new interruption and journeys into self reflection. This new perspective is the subject (themselves).

Behind My Smile

Riley is a girl struggling with her emotional health, and thinks itʻs better to just let it be. She pushes away her peers, as well as any help theyʻre offered. When they accidently yell at one of their friends, and realize she hurt their feelings, it's evident to them that ignoring their problems is not working. They end up calling out for their school counselor, hoping sheʻs still willing to lend an ear and listen. This short film was produced during the Youth Mental Wellness Reel Camp for Girls organized by Hawai‘i Women in Filmmaking in collaboration with Mental Health America of Hawaiʻi and the UHM Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation Campus Center and thanks to the generous support of the National Endowments for the Arts.

Angel Cake

On her birthday, our protagonist struggles with balancing disordered eating habits with the weight of turning 18. Director Statement: The story we created was a more realistic portrayal of eating disorders. I was looking to create a story that does not exclusively focus on the restrictive aspect of having an eating disorder, but to also show the other side effects that come with this disorder such as self-isolation and binging. Eating disorders are often portrayed by underweight white women and romanticize disordered eating; we wanted to portray it honestly, including the parts that we do not often see. This short film was produced during 2022 Making Media That Matters (Jan 22 - March 5, 2022) organized by Hawaiʻi Women in Filmmaking.

2 Pigs In A Blanket

Our film is about ADHD and Autism stereotypes. In our film we hope to educate you on wrongful stereotyping. In our film we hope to educate you on wrongful stereotyping. And show you what a real day in a life is for an ADHD and Autism person. Many with ADHD and Autism are always seen as the stereotypes created by those who don't have these neurological disorders. Those with these disorders are seen differently then they are and we want to educate people to help them know the true side to these disorders.

Finding Us

This film is about three girls that struggle with their mental health. All three of them meet unexpectedly in a bathroom and become friends instantly. They all overcame their mental struggles by helping each other get through it. This short film was produced during the Youth Mental Wellness Reel Camp for Girls organized by Hawai‘i Women in Filmmaking in collaboration with Mental Health America of Hawaiʻi and the UHM Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation Campus Center and thanks to the generous support of the National Endowments for the Arts.

Monotonous Cycle

A teenage girl going through her day to day life, is excited for school to open up for the 2020-2021 school year, and is dismayed to find out that it will remain online because of the pandemic. She decides to turn to video games in order to cope with the government issued lockdown. This short film was made to shed light on how the pandemic has negatively affected teensʻ lives because of the monotonous and repetitive schedule that quarantine pushed upon us. Our main character spirals to the point where she gives up on maintaining herself and her space because she sees no point in trying. Due to feeling isolated, I think that many teens hit that same low during lockdown, where they only did things that gave them instant gratification and neglected either school work or physical/mental health.

Facade

A teenage girl named Kia wakes up to find a mysterious person with her face living her life.

O is for Oliver

In the film, O is for Oliver, a young woman named Jane discovers a new part of herself, and starts her journey as nonbinary. But, their mental health and ability to efficiently work in the office is stunted due to constant deadnaming and misgendering. This short film was produced during the Youth Mental Wellness Reel Camp for Girls organized by Hawai‘i Women in Filmmaking in collaboration with Mental Health America of Hawaiʻi and the UHM Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation Campus Center and thanks to the generous support of the National Endowments for the Arts.

I Want What Is Best For You

Stella is a young girl who wants to pursue her music career, however, her mother has other plans for her to become an engineer. Stella goes through an internal struggle trying to get her mothers approval while still pursuing what she loves most behind her mothers back. Live life on your own terms and stop seeking approval from other people.

Two Faced

Jasmine comes face to face with two influencers that she admires. As she makes decisions throughout her day, the two influencers tell her what to do. When everything becomes too much for Jasmine, she has to decide what is important to her.

45min 2sec

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The views and opinions expressed in this online screening are those of the presenters and participants, and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of ITVS, public broadcasting, or any entities hosting the screening.