I Know Why The Cage Bird Sings

October 21, 2020
6:00pm Central Time
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Welcome

During the summer of 1968, KQED in San Francisco co-produced, along with the Ford Foundation's National Educational Television (the predecessor to today's Public Broadcasting Service (PBS)), a ten episode series entitled "Blacks, Blues, Black!" hosted by Maya Angelou.

The series was thought to be lost. In 2013, Maya Angelou stated publicly that she wished that the series had been archived, initiating a nationwide search for it. The complete series was soon located in the Library of Congress. After a year-long digitalizing project, on May 14, 2014, the series was finally ready for public viewing again.

Maya Angelou was immediately notified and plans begun to air the series nationally. Then, on May 28, 2014, Maya Angelou died. The plans were abandoned.

This screening will be the first national pubic screening of "Blacks, Blues, Black!" since 1968.

Video Descriptions

The Shelter-in-Place Virtual Film Series

The Shelter-in-Place Virtual Film Series is a joint project of Arkansas PBS (ArPBS), Just Communities of Arkansas (JCA), Arkansas Cinema Society (ACS), Washitaw Foothills Youth Media Arts & Literacy Collective (WFYMALC), Arkansas Minority Film & Arts Association (AMFAA), and Arkansas Peace & Justice Memorial Movement (APJMM).

The Shelter-in-Place Virtual Film Series

The Shelter-in-Place Virtual Film Series is a joint project of Arkansas PBS (ArPBS), Just Communities of Arkansas (JCA), Arkansas Cinema Society (ACS), Washitaw Foothills Youth Media Arts & Literacy Collective (WFYMALC), Arkansas Minority Film & Arts Association (AMFAA), and Arkansas Peace & Justice Memorial Movement (APJMM).

20 Seconds or More ft. Doug E. Fresh, Artie Green & Gerry Gunn

20 Seconds or More was created by Hip Hop Public Health to empower youth and families with the right information, tools and resources to help mitigate the spread of COVID-19. Watch the music video to learn proper handwashing techniques, safety protocols and what to do if you have symptoms. Featured guests include Ashanti, Adrian “Easy AD” Harris, Artie Green, Big Daddy Kane, Bill Bellamy, Benita Fitzgerald Mosley, Cedric the Entertainer, Chuck D, Charlie Mack, Charlamagne tha God, Capone, Cole Anthony, Darryl “DMC” McDaniels, Doug E. Fresh, Drederick Irving, Gerry Gunn, Jamie Foxx, Janell Snowden, Jesse Itzler, Jordin Sparks, Joseph Rev. “RUN” Simmons, Kelly Price, LisaRaye McCoy, Maurice DuBois, Michael Blackson, Monie Love, Pete Rock, Rasheed Wallace,  Sara Blakely, Sky Katz, Teddy Riley, Tori Kelly, Toya Johnson, Dr. Olajide Williams, Lori Rose Benson, NYPD Assistant Chief Juanita N. Holmes, Dr. James Noble and family, LaShawn Jones, Santa Maria-Gronholm family, Rivera-Ezeta family and Dr. Danielle Chase. Spread the word using #20SecondsOrMore and tag us in your video to get featured. Follow us on: → Twitter.com/HHPHorg → Instagram.com/HHPHorg → Facebook.com/HHPHorg → LinkedIn.com/company/15272555 Learn more at HHPH.org/20SecondsOrMore Join the movement at HHPH.org/JoinUs Donate at HHPH.org/Donate

The Shelter-in-Place Virtual Film Series

The Shelter-in-Place Virtual Film Series is a joint project of Arkansas PBS (ArPBS), Just Communities of Arkansas (JCA), Arkansas Cinema Society (ACS), Washitaw Foothills Youth Media Arts & Literacy Collective (WFYMALC), Arkansas Minority Film & Arts Association (AMFAA), and Arkansas Peace & Justice Memorial Movement (APJMM).

Register, Inform Yourself and Vote PSA

The adapted theme song of the 2020 V-REP (Voter Registration, Education & Participation) Film Series

Black History Month 2020

2020 has held a mirror up to the world and forced many to see the reality of racism in all its guises. From Black people dying disproportionately in the pandemic, to the horrific murder of George Floyd and no justice for Breonna Taylor – the 26-year-old emergency medical worker killed by police in her own home. In the UK, the scale and impact of institutionalised racism has been laid bare, with young Black men stopped and searched 20,000 times in London during the coronavirus lockdown (the equivalent of 1 in 4 young Black men), along with Black MPs, barristers, senior police officers, sportspeople and many more. #BlackLivesMatter protests around the world sparked a commitment among many individuals and organisations to educate themselves about Black #history, #heritage and #culture – as part of understanding racism and standing in solidarity against it. If that commitment is to transcend beyond social media into real change, everyone, from all communities, needs to embrace Black History Month as a starting point for exploring, discovering and celebrating Black history, heritage and culture – both past and contemporary. From the incredible achievements and contributions, to the many untold stories and barriers to progress – the day-to-day reality of institutionalised racism. Crucially, this year’s #BlackHistoryMonth is a time to shine a light on our shared British history and tell the whole story honestly and truthfully, to decolonise and reclaim history, and tell stories from the perspective of all people – not just the rich white men in power. The felling of contentious statues and monuments is just the start, now it’s time to ask communities how colonial objects and symbols are used to tell the true story of history. Black History Month 2020 is also a time to look forward and celebrate the here and now – and the future possibilities. In years gone by, October has been the only time of year when the UK talks about the achievements of Black people in #Britain. Hopefully, the events of 2020 will be a catalyst for Black history to be shared much more widely – in museums, galleries, schools, universities, public spaces and communities. Black people have always made history and always will – but it’s equally important that Black people take the lead on how that history is discovered, explored, researched, recorded, archived, curated, exhibited and shared. That means supporting Black-led heritage organisations and professionals; making national and local institutions much more accessible and representative; and empowering communities to define and share what Black history means to them. Black culture isn’t just a commodity to be appropriated and monetised, and Black history isn’t just a month to be ticked off a calendar dominated by a white-washed version of history. Black History Month 2020 is a time for people to come together and hopefully learn lessons for the present and the future. It’s a time to honour the commitment to learning and standing united against racism. It’s a time to reclaim history and re-imagine how our shared history will be told in the future. www.blackhistorymonth.org.uk

The Legacy of Racial Injustice

Now is the time to join the fight for racial equality, confront our nation's history of racial bigotry and begin the era of truth and justice. The Equal Justice Initiative works to end mass incarceration, excessive punishment, and racial inequality. Visit our website to learn more: eji.org Facebook: www.facebook.com/equaljusticeinitiative Twitter: twitter.com/eji_org Instagram: www.instagram.com/eji_org/

The Shelter-in-Place Virtual Film Series

The Shelter-in-Place Virtual Film Series is a joint project of Arkansas PBS (ArPBS), Just Communities of Arkansas (JCA), Arkansas Cinema Society (ACS), Washitaw Foothills Youth Media Arts & Literacy Collective (WFYMALC), Arkansas Minority Film & Arts Association (AMFAA), and Arkansas Peace & Justice Memorial Movement (APJMM).

I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings (1979) Diahann Carroll Constance Good Maya Angelou

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings is an American television film based on the autobiography of the same name by Maya Angelou, first aired April 28, 1979 on CBS. Angelou and Leonora Thuna wrote the screenplay, and the movie was directed by Fielder Cook. Constance Good played the young Maya Angelou. Also appearing were Esther Rolle, Roger E. Mosley, Diahann Carroll, Ruby Dee, and Madge Sinclair. Filming took place in Vicksburg, Mississippi. The movie traces Maya's life from when she and her brother move in with their grandmother to the trauma of being raped as a young girl by one of her mother's boyfriends and the several years of silence that came after the attack. Two scenes in the movie differed from events described in the book. Angelou added a scene between Maya and Uncle Willie after the Joe Louis fight. In it, he expresses his feelings of redemption after Louis defeats a white opponent. Angelou also presents her eighth-grade graduation differently in the film. In the book, Henry Reed delivers the valedictory speech and leads the black audience in the Negro national anthem. In the movie, Maya conducts these activities. - Wikipedia. Shared for historical purposes. I do not own the rights. ##### Reelblack's mission is to educate, elevate, entertain enlighten, and empower through Black film. If there is content shared on this platform that you feel infringes on your intellectual property, please email me at Reelblack@mail.com and info@reelblack.com with details and it will be promptly removed.

The Shelter-in-Place Virtual Film Series

The Shelter-in-Place Virtual Film Series is a joint project of Arkansas PBS (ArPBS), Just Communities of Arkansas (JCA), Arkansas Cinema Society (ACS), Washitaw Foothills Youth Media Arts & Literacy Collective (WFYMALC), Arkansas Minority Film & Arts Association (AMFAA), and Arkansas Peace & Justice Memorial Movement (APJMM).

104min 43sec

Moderator

  • Kwami Abdul-Bey

    Co-Convenor of the Arkansas Peace & Justice Memorial Movement

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The views and opinions expressed in this online screening are those of the presenters and participants, and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of ITVS, public broadcasting, or any entities hosting the screening.