Dear Georgina

May 5, 2020
12:30pm Pacific Time
 05/05/2020 12:30:00 pm05/05/2020 01:30:00 pmAmerica/Los_AngelesDear Georgina Join the Emmy winning team behind DAWNLAND or a special digital screening of FIRST LIGHT and DEAR GEORGINA in this special workshop for educators. For centuries, the United States government has taken Native American children away from their tribes, devastating parents and denying children their traditions, culture, and identity. First Light documents these practices from the 1800s to today and tells the story of an unprecedented experiment in truth-telling and healing for Wabanaki people and child welfare workers in Maine. As revealed in FIRST LIGHT in 2015 the Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission concluded that Native people in Maine continue to be targets of "cultural genocide." In DEAR GEORGINA a Passamaquoddy elder journeys into an unclear past to better understand herself and her cultural heritage. Join the filmmaker Adam Mazo, learning director Mishy Lesser, Sarah Shear and scholar Dina Gilio-Whitaker (Colville Confederated Tribes) for a discussion in historical and intergenerational trauma and take away tools for use in your classroom. Learn more about the films and watch the trailer at upstanderproject.orghttps://ovee.itvs.org/screenings/43nkmnaima.pettigrew+6@itvs.orgfalseMM/DD/YYYY

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Welcome

Join the Emmy winning team behind DAWNLAND or a special digital screening of FIRST LIGHT and DEAR GEORGINA in this special workshop for educators.

For centuries, the United States government has taken Native American children away from their tribes, devastating parents and denying children their traditions, culture, and identity. First Light documents these practices from the 1800s to today and tells the story of an unprecedented experiment in truth-telling and healing for Wabanaki people and child welfare workers in Maine. As revealed in FIRST LIGHT in 2015 the Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission concluded that Native people in Maine continue to be targets of "cultural genocide."

In DEAR GEORGINA a Passamaquoddy elder journeys into an unclear past to better understand herself and her cultural heritage.

Join the filmmaker Adam Mazo, learning director Mishy Lesser, Sarah Shear and scholar Dina Gilio-Whitaker (Colville Confederated Tribes) for a discussion in historical and intergenerational trauma and take away tools for use in your classroom.

Learn more about the films and watch the trailer at upstanderproject.org

Video Descriptions

Welcome to OVEE

OVEE INTRO_buff

12min 36sec

Moderator

Panelists

  • Adam Mazo

    Adam Mazo is an Emmy® award-winning filmmaker and the director of the Upstander Project and co-director and producer of First Light, and the feature-length film, Dawnland. Adam also directed and produced Coexist (WORLD Channel, Africa Movie Academy Award Nominee). He co-founded the Upstander Project in 2009. He is originally from Minnesota, graduated from the University of Florida, and now lives in Boston with his wife and sons.

  • Mishy Lesser, Ed. D.

    Mishy Lesser, Ed.D., is the learning director of the Upstander Project and the founder, co-director, curriculum designer and a lead facilitator of the Upstander Academy, a weeklong professional learning experience for teachers and museum educators that focuses on genocide and human rights education and the skills of upstanders. She spent years researching and writing the Teacher’s Guide for Dawnland, contributing to its 2019 Emmy® for Outstanding Research. Mishy authored the Coexist Teacher’s Guide to promote learning about the complexity of reconciliation in post-genocide Rwanda. She is a Circle Keeper and has been featured on WBUR (Boston) and PRI/BBC’s The World. Mishy was a Fulbright Scholar in Ecuador and spent 12 years learning and working in the Andes. She is currently an Education Fellow at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center at the University of Connecticut.

  • Dina Gilio-Whitaker

    Dina Gilio-Whitaker (Colville Confederated Tribes) is a lecturer of American Indian Studies at California State University San Marcos, and a consultant and educator in environmental justice policy planning. Dina’s research focuses on Indigenous nationalism, self-determination, environmental justice, and education. She also works within the field of critical sports studies, examining the intersections of indigeneity and the sport of surfing. Dina is co-author with Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz of Beacon Press’s “All the Real Indians Died Off” and 20 Other Myths About Native Americans, and author of, As Long as Grass Grows: The Indigenous Fight for Environmental Justice from Colonization to Standing Rock.

  • Dr. Sarah B. Shear

    Dr. Sarah B. Shear is an Assistant Professor of Social Studies and Multicultural Education at the University of Washington-Bothell. She earned her doctorate in Learning, Teaching, and Curriculum from the University of Missouri in 2014 with concentrations in social studies education and Indigenous Studies. Sarah examines K-12 social studies curriculum within Indigenous contexts, as well as race/ism and settler colonialism in K-12 social studies teacher education, popular media, and qualitative methodologies. As a member of the Turtle Island Social Studies Collective, Sarah is committed to collective action to combat oppression in education and academia. In addition, Sarah co-edited (Re)Imagining Elementary Social Studies: A Controversial Issues Reader (Information Age Press, 2018) and Marking the Invisible: Articulating Whiteness in Social Studies Education (Information Age Press, in press). Her efforts have been featured by Zinn Project, Teaching Tolerance, and Huffington Post. Sarah is also a co-founding member of the Elementary Social Studies Education Summit and the forthcoming open-peer reviewed, open access journal The Critical Social Educator.

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The views and opinions expressed in this online screening are those of the presenters and participants, and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of ITVS, public broadcasting, or any entities hosting the screening.