9to5: The Story of a Movement

January 21, 2021
7:00pm Mountain Time
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Welcome

Welcome to tonight's screening and discussion co-hosted by NMPBS and The Society of Professional Journalists.

Before the hit song or film, 9to5 was an inspiring movement for equality that encapsulated the spirit of both the women’s and labor movements of the 1970s.

following the film, join a panel discussion moderated by journalists Megan Kamerick and Jerry Redfern.

Video Descriptions

Trailer | Mr. SOUL!

Premiering in 1968, SOUL! was the first nationally broadcast all-Black variety show on public television, merging artists from the margins with post-Civil Rights Black radical thought. Mr. SOUL! delves into this critical moment in television history, as well as the man who guided it, highlighting a turning point in representation whose impact continues to resonate to this day.

Trailer | 9to5: The Story of a Movement

When Dolly Parton sang “9 to 5,” she was singing about a real movement that started with a group of secretaries in the early 1970s. Their goals were simple—better pay, more advancement opportunities and an end to sexual harassment—but as seen in 9to5: The Story of a Movement, their fight that inspired a hit would change the American workplace forever.

Filmmakers Introduction

Before the hit song or film, 9to5 was an inspiring demand for equality that encapsulated the spirit of both the women’s and labor movements of the 1970s.

9to5: The Story of a Movement - Indie Lens Pop Up

Before the hit song or film, 9to5 was an inspiring demand for equality that encapsulated the spirit of both the women’s and labor movements of the 1970s.

120 minutes

Moderator

Panelists

  • Megan Kamerick

    Megan has been a journalist for 25 years and worked at business weeklies in San Antonio, New Orleans and Albuquerque. She first came to KUNM as a phone volunteer on the pledge drive in 2005. That led to volunteering on Women’s Focus and Weekend Edition, the Global Music Show - and her job first as Morning Edition host and now All Things Considered host - fulfilling a long-held wish to learn radio. In 2012, she moved into television with New Mexico PBS where she produced “Public Square” and “New Mexico in Focus.” Megan has produced stories for National Public Radio, Latino USA and Marketplace. She’s passionate about getting women’s voices into media and is the former president of the Journalism & Women Symposium. Her TED talk on women and media has more than 272,000 views. She’s the treasurer for the Society of Professional Journalists’ Rio Grande Chapter.

  • Jerry Redfern

    Visual journalist Jerry Redfern covers the environmental and humanitarian issues across Southeast Asia and other developing regions, as well as at home in the US. His work ranges from the aftermath of American bombs in Laos to agroforestry in Belize to life amid logging in Borneo. Jerry’s photos have appeared in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Forbes, and Der Spiegel, among others. He has contributed to four book projects, including Eternal Harvest: The Legacy of American Bombs in Laos (co-authored with Karen Coates), which was a finalist for the IRE Book Award. After graduating with a degree in journalism from the University of Montana, he spent several years as a staff photographer at newspapers in the American West. He began his freelance career in Cambodia where he shot news, features and investigative stories for Agence France-Presse, The New York Times, The Cambodia Daily and other publications. These days he works with video as well as photos, and he is in the final stages of post-production on his first feature-length documentary film, Eternal Harvest, an extension of the book project. Jerry was a 2012-2013 Ted Scripps Fellow in Environmental Journalism at the Center for Environmental Journalism at the University of Colorado at Boulder and a Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University.

  • Martha Burk

    Dr. Martha Burk is a political psychologist and women's issues expert and national consultant on gender pay equity (see separate webpage), to governments at all levels and corporations. She is co-founder of the Center for Advancement of Public Policy, a research and policy analysis organization in Washington, D.C. Dr. Burk serves as the Money Editor for Ms magazine, and is a syndicated newspaper columnist and blogger for womensvoicesmedia.org . Burk’s latest book, Your Voice, Your Vote: The Savvy Woman’s Guide to Politics, Power, and the Change We Need, is a Ms magazine book selection.

  • Giovanna Rossi

    Giovanna is President/Owner of Collective Action Strategies LLC and is Adjunct Faculty in the Department of Family & Community Medicine and Women’s Studies Program at the University of New Mexico. Giovanna received her masters degree in Public Policy and Public Administration from the London School of Economics, and her bachelors degree from the University of New Mexico in Latin American Studies and Spanish. Formerly the executive director of the New Mexico Women’s Health Office, Giovanna has been working on public health and social justice policy issues for 16 years.

  • Cathryn McGill

    The New Mexico Black History Organizing Committee was founded by Cathryn McGill in 2010 with the goal of building and strengthening our community from the inside out and creating an annual New Mexico Black History Month Festival to promote multiculturalism and a strong New Mexico. She currently serves as the NMBHOC Director and the CEO of the New Mexico Black Leadership Council.

  • Adriann Barboa

    Bernalillo County Commissioner Barboa’s experience working as a case manager for youth facing houselessness and for juvenile community corrections gives her the understanding of our systems of care and where those systems are successful in supporting young people to thrive, and she has also witnessed first-hand the barriers and breaks in care that cause harm. Commissioner Barboa is a graduate of Albuquerque High School and went on to study at the University of New Mexico. She has been an executive director, a field director and currently serves as policy director for Forward Together, a policy and culture shift organization.

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The views and opinions expressed in this online screening are those of the presenters and participants, and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of ITVS, public broadcasting, or any entities hosting the screening.